Invention

Robotics team gets patent to help animals communicate

A group of teenagers now hold a patent thanks to a product they invented in college. WISN 12 visited St. Peter’s School in East Troy to share their story. Students programmed a microchip to help pets communicate with their owners. with improving the way animals and humans interact,” explained East Troy Senior Mary Schrieber. The college project in 2017 can detect temperature, blood sugar and movement. They named it “Friendchip”. “We progressed to the world championship of this organization and ended up in the top three,” said Mary Schrieber. .There were 32,000 teams from all over the world. But they wanted more. “We thought we had a really good idea here, so we ended up contacting Foley & Lardner, which is a local patent office,” explained Mukwonago senior Olivia S. ween said “Then a few weeks later they contacted us and asked if they could pro bono help us get this patent. And obviously we’re like, ‘Yeah!’ “Said East Troy junior Lucy Schrieber. After middle school, the kids all went to high school, but they never gave up their “Friendchip.” After five years, as much of the team prepares to graduate from high school, they have just received a message. “They emailed us and they were like ‘Congratulations! You’re officially inventors,’ and we were so excited,” East Troy senior Sarah Scanlan said, “Oh my God, we have a patent!” said Lucy Schrieber. I just hope we can inspire other people and other women to get into this industry because it’s not just for men. It’s… We need more women in STEM,” Sween said. The 2017 Brickbusters consisted of eight members, seven of whom are girls. They are still deciding what to do with their new patent.

A group of teenagers now hold a patent thanks to a product they invented in college.

WISN 12 visited St. Peter’s School in East Troy to share their story.

The students programmed a microchip to help pets communicate with their owners.

They call themselves the Brickbusters robotics team.

“Through the entrepreneurial side of the competition, we have been tasked with improving the way animals and humans interact,” explained East Troy senior Mary Schrieber.

“It was really just a microchip that had a bunch of sensors in it that would let humans know how their animals were feeling,” said Hannah Schulgen, head of Mukwonago.

Their college project in 2017 can detect temperature, blood sugar and movement.

They named it “Friendchip”.

“We advanced to this organization’s world championship and ended up making it into the top three,” said Mary Schrieber.

There were 32,000 teams from all over the world.

But they wanted more.

“We thought we had a really good idea here, so we ended up contacting Foley & Lardner, which is a local patent office,” said Mukwonago senior Olivia Sween.

“Then a few weeks later they contacted us and asked if they could help us pro bono to get this patent. And obviously we’re like, ‘Yeah!'” said Lucy Schrieber, Jr. East Troy.

After middle school, the kids all went to high school, but they never gave up their “Friendchip.”

After five years, as much of the team prepares to graduate from high school, they just received word.

“They emailed us, and they were like, ‘Congratulations! You’re officially inventors, “and we were so excited,” said East Troy senior Sarah Scanlan.

“Oh my God, we have a patent!” said Lucy Schrieber.

Teenagers with a patent who hope to motivate other students.

“I just hope we can inspire other people and other women to get into this industry because it’s not just for men. It’s… We need more women in STEM,” Sween said.

The 2017 Brickbusters consisted of eight members, including seven girls.

They are still deciding what to do with their new patent.