Machines

Ohio to spend $10.5 million on ballistic tracking machines

Heads of state on Thursday announced plans to spend $10.5 million on additional machines used to track ballistic evidence of gun crimes. The spending increases the number of Ohio National Integrated Ballistic Information Network units from nine to 16. The units analyze the microscopic marks on the bullets and casings and compare them to similar evidence of other crimes committed with firearms. Matches can indicate whether weapons were used in multiple shootings and provide investigators with leads to help solve crimes. The money will be used to pay for seven units for the state Bureau of Criminal Investigation, including two mobile units and two stationary units for the Ohio State Highway Patrol. The funding was announced by Ohio Governor Mike DeWine, Attorney General Dave Yost and State Patrol Superintendent Col. Richard Fambro

Heads of state on Thursday announced plans to spend $10.5 million on additional machines used to track ballistic evidence of gun crimes.

The spending increases the number of Ohio National Integrated Ballistic Information Network units from nine to 16. The units analyze the microscopic marks on the bullets and casings and compare them to similar evidence of other crimes committed with firearms.

Matches can indicate whether weapons were used in multiple shootings and provide investigators with leads to help solve crimes. The money will be used to pay for seven units for the state Bureau of Criminal Investigation, including two mobile units and two stationary units for the Ohio State Highway Patrol.

The funding was announced by Ohio Governor Mike DeWine, Attorney General Dave Yost and State Patrol Superintendent Col. Richard Fambro